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Firefox Quantum

1 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-17 18:17
WTF IT LOOKS LIKE TOTAL GARBAGE.
2 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-17 19:08
It looks good
3 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-17 19:09
I was finally forced to switch to pale moon when I saw that monstrosity. I can't believe cuckfox doesn't understand that the only people who use the browser nowadays use it out of habit since 2012. When they completely destroy the traditional UI they only lose users. What a joke.
4 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-17 19:23
Wow, I'm butthurt now.
5 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-17 23:17
I don't mind it so much, took me a few minutes to get the interface how I like though
6 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-18 01:14
Tab Mix Plus isn't working anymore, is there any alternative? I just want the 'recently closed tabs' list.
7 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-18 03:37
I found one called undo closed tabs button.
8 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-18 09:46
Firefox s probably the best browser after this update.
9 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-18 18:07
Firefox s probably the worst browser after this update.
10 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-18 19:11
Firefox s probably the middlest browser after this update.
11 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-18 23:10
no, your thinking of dese dubzs:
<-
12 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-19 16:36
I switched to seamonkey in 2013. They never change the UI but the add ons are limited.
13 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-19 16:51
major hiccup with 4-ch - old owner let the domain expire, now transferred it the new owner
14 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-19 18:45
That's major.
15 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-25 10:07
Why can't Firefox figure out how to provide a native 'warn before close multiple tabs' function? This update made things look fancy, but where's the innovative functionality?
16 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-27 23:25
>>15
You can't spell "innovative" without "no native"
17 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-28 01:49
>>16
There's no " " in innovative.....
18 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-28 04:25
>>17
But there is in "innovative".....
19 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-28 11:57
Using Firefox makes me feel like I'm using a quantum computer.
20 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-28 21:48
I don't care about how it looks, only about how effective is its performance.
21 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-28 22:26
>>20
So you're saying you would literally eat garbage as long as it was nutritious?
22 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-29 00:20
One man's garbage is another man's meal.
23 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-29 05:07
>>21
I don't understand how something would be garbage and nutritious at the same time.
24 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-29 05:45
Firefox is now using more memory and CPU than ever. After a few hours my Quantum is using 80+% of my memory, it never got that high before.
25 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-29 07:42
>>23
Lobsters.
26 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-29 18:47
>>25
They're neither garbage nor nutritious.
27 Name: Anonymous 2017-11-29 23:05
>>26

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Lobster: Nutritional Information, Health Benefits
Published Wednesday 2 December 2015
By Megan Ware RDN LD

Lobster is a type of shellfish typically boiled or steamed for consumption. Lobster can be eaten as a main course, on a roll or added to rich dishes like pasta, mashed potatoes and eggs Benedict, adding an element of decadence.

Despite its desirable reputation today, lobster was not always known as a pricey indulgence. In the 17th century, colonists in Massachusetts considered lobster shells in a home to be a sign of poverty and only fed lobster to their servants.

In the 1940s, you could buy a can of baked beans for 53 cents per pound and canned lobster for 11 cents per pound.

Lobster is now seen as a delicacy, in part because of the discovery that cooking the lobster live made it more appetizing, as opposed to killing it first and cooking it later.

This MNT Knowledge Center feature is part of a collection of articles on the health benefits of popular foods. It provides a nutritional breakdown of lobster and an in-depth look at its possible health benefits, how to incorporate more lobster into your diet and any potential health risks of consuming lobster.

Contents of this article:

Nutritional breakdown of lobster
Possible health benefits of consuming lobster
How to incorporate more lobster into your diet
Potential health risks of consuming lobster

Nutritional breakdown of lobster
Lobster.
Lobster is rich in copper and selenium, and also contains a number of other important nutrients.

According to the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database, one cup of cooked lobster (approximately 145 grams) contains 129 calories, 1 gram of fat, 0 grams of carbohydrate and 28 grams of protein, as well as 2% of daily vitamin A needs, 7% of calcium and 2% of iron.

Lobster is a rich source of copper and selenium and also contains zinc, phosphorus, vitamin B12, magnesium, vitamin E and a small amount of omega-3 fatty acids.

Lobster does contain cholesterol. However, recent studies have suggested that the cholesterol content in foods does not necessarily increase harmful cholesterol in the body and that saturated fat intake is more directly related to an increase in harmful cholesterol levels. Lobster is not a significant source of saturated fat.
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Possible benefits of consuming lobster

Many studies have suggested that increasing consumption of fish and shellfish like lobster decreases the risk of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease while promoting healthy cholesterol levels.

Fish and shellfish are especially important for providing omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in very few foods. A three-ounce portion of wild spiny lobster is estimated to provide 200-500 milligrams of omega-3s while the more common northern lobster provides 200 milligrams or less for the same portion. To compare, three ounces of wild salmon provide over 1500 mg of omega-3s.

Although the fatty acid content in lobster is not the highest among fish and shellfish, it should still be a source to consider based on the fact that most people are not getting enough omega-3s from food.
Image of the thyroid gland.
Lobster is a good source of selenium, a nutrient that is crucial to proper thyroid functioning.
Thyroid disease

Selenium has been shown to be a necessary component for proper in thyroid function. A meta-analysis has shown that those with thyroid disease who are selenium deficient experience pronounced benefits when increasing their selenium intake, including weight loss and reduced risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes.1 Lobster is a good source of selenium, along with Brazil nuts and yellowfin tuna.
Mental health benefits

According to the National Institute on Alcohol and Abuse and Alcoholism of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD, omega-3 fatty acids have also been shown to decrease aggression, impulsivity and depression in adults. This association is even stronger for kids with mood disorders and disorderly conduct issues, like some types of ADHD.2
Anemia

Copper works together with iron to form red blood cells. Anemia occurs when you do not have enough red blood cells or your red blood cells do not function properly. Consuming adequate copper will benefit people with all forms of anemia.3,4 Many people do not get enough copper in their diet. Lobster has one of the highest levels of copper of any food.
How to incorporate more lobster into your diet
Lobster pasta.
Lobster can easily be added to pasta dishes as a source of protein.

Quick tips:

Use lobster as your main protein source
Add lobster to pasta or rice dishes
Mince lobster to top salads
Make lobster patties or burgers.

Avoid drenching your lobster in cheap butter, which is what they serve at many seafood restaurants. Instead, choose a high quality, grass-fed butter and use sparingly. Squeeze a lemon wedge over your lobster for a burst of flavor.

Or, try these healthy and delicious recipes developed by registered dietitians:
Mini lobster pasta
Lobster and tarragon risotto
Grilled California avocado and drunken lobster salad.
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Potential health risks of consuming lobster

Shellfish are a common food allergen. Avoid lobster if you have a history of shellfish allergy.5

Lobster can contain a moderate level of mercury and should be consumed six times or less per month.6 Pregnant women especially should watch their intake of potentially high mercury foods.

To minimize the risk of food-borne illness, buy fresh lobster properly refrigerated at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below. Pick up lobster at the end of your shopping trip to minimize the time it is exposed to warmer temperatures. If the lobster smells overly "fishy," it should be discarded.7

If buying frozen lobster, be sure to defrost in the refrigerator, not on the counter or in the sink, so there is no opportunity for bacteria growth. Lobster should be cooked to an internal temperature of 145 degrees Fahrenheit.7

It is important to note that the total diet or overall eating pattern is the most important factor for disease prevention and achieving good health. It is better to eat a diet with variety than to concentrate on individual foods as the key to good health.

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What are the health benefits of cobalt? Find out about the potential health benefits of consuming cobalt in foods, including preventing abnormal development of red blood cells, which causes macrocytic anemia, Read now
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Dave September 9, 2016 7:48 am

Many people eat cooked lobster by dipping or even soaking the flesh in a bowl of white vinegar. This is far better than using heated butter & is very tasty.
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28 Name: Anonymous 2018-02-07 18:42
switched to Chrome afterward

why use a cheap imitation when the real thing is there

it seems every year I swing back and forth between Chrome and FF
inb4 chromium
29 Name: Anonymous 2018-02-09 13:40
>>28
I am not partisan to anything. I have Chromium, FF, Waterfox and Brave installed at the same time. My main is FF but I use the others to support to me in when I need to see different groups of web pages but I don't want to "pollute" the tab space of a single browser.
30 Name: Anonymous 2018-02-09 19:54
>>29
Not partisan he says, while using TWO alt right browsers (Chromium and Brave).
31 Name: Anonymous 2018-02-09 22:57
>>30
What do you mean by this?
32 Name: Anonymous 2018-02-09 23:56
>>31
Chromium and Brave are alt right browsers, dude....
33 Name: Anonymous 2018-02-10 11:05
>>32
I still have no idea what you mean by this.
34 Name: Anonymous 2018-02-10 16:19
>>33
Xe's wrong. Chromium is a postmodern leftist browser.
35 Name: Anonymous 2018-02-11 19:38
>>34
Wrong. Regular people use Chrome by Google, not Chromium.
36 Name: Anonymous 2018-02-12 01:46
>>35
I didn't say anything about ``regular people''.
37 Name: Anonymous 2018-02-12 03:07
>>36
Yes. You. DID.
38 Name: Anonymous 2018-02-12 04:14
>>37
No, but I will.

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